Course date

9 July - 3 August, 2001
Application deadline
15 February, 2001
Course Director(s): 

Roger Coate

Department of Government and Sociology, Georgia College & State University/ Department of Political Science, University of South Carolina, USA
Course Faculty: 

Paula L'Ecuyer

University of South Carolina, Walker Institute of International Studies, Columbia, United States of America

Vladislav Kravtsov

Walker Institute of International Studies, University of South Carolina, Columbia, United States of America

Donald Puchala

Walker Institute of international Studies, Department of Government and International Studies, University of South Carolina, Columbia, United States of America

James Rosenau

International Relations, George Washington University, Washington, D.C., United States of America

Timothy Shaw

Institute of International Relations, University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago

This course is especially designed to enhance the professional development of young scholars from developing countries who are interested in or actively engaged in research and teaching about international relations, international institutions, sustainable development, and human security. It will offer participants an in-depth analysis of the forces that will affect and challenges that will confront global governance in the twenty-first century and various steps that might be taken to enhance the effectiveness of international institutions in responding to the challenges of promoting sustainable human development and human security.

The course is a special component of a much larger transnational research and professional development program for young scholars in the social sciences and humanities. That project, the “Global Networking for Human Security Project," is in cooperation with the Office of the Secretary-General of the United Nations, the United Nations University, the Academic Council on the United Nations System, the International Studies Association. It is designed to build self-sustaining interdisciplinary research and teaching networks among scholars from different nationalities, cultures, professions, and disciplines. The course will offer participants an in-depth analysis of the forces that will affect and challenges that will confront institutions and practitioners of global governance in the twenty-first century and various steps that might be taken to enhance the effectiveness of international institutions in responding to those challenges. The course will present and challenge participants with the latest concepts, theories, empirical analyses, and teaching techniques about the nature, structures, and processes of global governance and the “new” multilateralism involving private sector, civil society, and social movement actors.