Legal studies

In co-operation with Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, New York and Hamline University School of Law, Minnesota

Course date

5 July - 23 July, 2004
Application deadline:
15 February, 2004
Course Director(s): 

Csilla Kollonay-Lehoczky

Department of Legal Studies, Central European University, Budapest, Hungary

Lela P. Love

Kukin Program of Conflict Resolution, Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, New York, USA
Course Faculty: 

James R. Coben

Mitchell Hamline School of Law, St. Paul, USA

Kinga Goncz

Former Minister of Foreign Affairs of Hungary

Julie Macfarlane

University of Windsor, Law, Windsor, Canada

Bernard Mayer

CDR Associates, Boulder, United States of America

Dana Potockova

Charles University and Anglo-American College, Prague, Czech Republic

Through lecture, discussion, demonstration and role-play, students will be introduced to mediation theory and skills and examine the impact of culture and context on the mediation approach adopted. Examples will focus on mediation models and scenarios from both the United States and Central and Eastern Europe. The task of translating hostile and adversarial communication into building blocks of collaborative dialogue will be explored, as well as the mediator's role in identifying, framing, and ordering the issues in dispute. Analysis will highlight persuasive techniques for moving parties from impasse to settlement. Special attention will be directed to the ethical dilemmas faced by mediators, particularly challenges to a mediator's impartiality, and the potential for abuse of discretion and power. The course also will examine a variety of strategies to foster and support democratic and constructive dialogue, particularly focusing on "high-conflict" situations involving inter-ethnic tensions. Students will study efforts in Central and Eastern Europe to promote meaningful democratic dialogue in times of national and international crisis. Participants should come prepared for a highly interactive learning experience.

Through lecture, discussion, demonstration and role-play, students will be introduced to mediation theory and skills and examine the impact of culture and context on the mediation approach adopted. Examples will focus on mediation models and scenarios from both the United States and Central and Eastern Europe. The task of translating hostile and adversarial communication into building blocks of collaborative dialogue will be explored, as well as the mediator's role in identifying, framing, and ordering the issues in dispute. Analysis will highlight persuasive techniques for moving parties from impasse to settlement. Special attention will be directed to the ethical dilemmas faced by mediators, particularly challenges to a mediator's impartiality, and the potential for abuse of discretion and power. The course also will examine a variety of strategies to foster and support democratic and constructive dialogue, particularly focusing on "high-conflict" situations involving inter-ethnic tensions. Students will study efforts in Central and Eastern Europe to promote meaningful democratic dialogue in times of national and international crisis. Participants should come prepared for a highly interactive learning experience.