Keynote speakers 2015

The panel discussions and keynote lectures are offered by leading scholars of several disciplines teaching at SUN, who will share their latest research, ideas and opinions. All these events are followed by a question and answer period when the speakers take and answer questions from the audience.
 

Public lecture 1 

GEOLOGICAL GRANDEUR, MINERAL METROPOLIS: EXPLORING A PHYSICAL HISTORY OF PARIS (18TH-19TH CENTURIES)

presented by the Cities and Science: Urban History and the History of Science in the Study of Early Modern and Modern Europe CEU Summer University course and Pasts, Inc. Center for Historical Studies

Date: 4:00 pm, Monday, June 29, 2015
Venue: #310/A1, CEU, Zrinyi u. 14

Lecturer: STÉPHANE VAN DAMME, Professor of History of Science, European University Institute, Florence, Italy
 
Abstract:
 
The case of Paris provides a touchstone for this lecture on the intersection of the history of science with environmental history. Interest in the intersection of these fields has grown rapidly over the past decade in the urban context. On the one hand, history of science paid more attention to the relations between science and the city, especially on environmental sciences and medicine such as meteorology, environmental health, but urban natural sciences remained a subject often discussed on the fringes of histories of geology, biology, zoology and pharmacy; however, few studies had the ambition to tackle the idea of a physical history of metropolises at a whole. On the other hand, environmental history started to reformulate the classical opposition between nature and urbanity.  For some decades now, under the influence of new thinking on “sustainable cities”, urban ecology, environmental sciences has shifted the ground under these old questions, reformulating them from a more environmentalist perspective showing the deep impact of engineering the city. Urban nature returned to the historiographic arena through twin processes: socializing urban nature through technologies and economy, which led historians to pay attention to risks, industrial revolution, recycling and to explain urban political economy, or naturalizing the metropolis through urban parks in a culturalist vein which led historians to analyse the revitalization of city-centers or the romantic critique to industrialization. However, these two historiographies assume that social and cultural forces and physical power are distinct phenomena, hardly related. The aim of this lecture is to bridge that historiographical gap by taking advantage of new developments in the history of science and urban history.
 

Public lecture 2

ENGINEERING CITIES:THE APPLIANCE OF SCIENCE

presented by the Cities and Science: Urban History and the History of Science in the Study of Early Modern and Modern Europe CEU Summer University course, Pasts, Inc. Center for Historical Studies and the Urban History Journal

Date: 4:00 pm, Tuesday, June 30, 2015
Venue: #310/A1, CEU, Zrinyi u. 14

Lecturer: RICHARD RODGER,  Professor of Economic and Social History, University of Edinburgh, UK
 
Abstract:
 
Often, too often, the relationship between urban development and scientific endeavor is overlooked. This lecture will consider how the physical world - geological and hydrological – conditions the nature and pace of city development over the long term. Whereas we have a considerable amount of information about demographic, economic, and socio-cultural determinants of European urban development some areas such as legal and scientific dimensions are too often overlooked. This illustrated lecture will engage in general terms and suggest that putting science, medicine, and engineering back into our understanding of towns and cities is overdue. 
 

Public lecture 3

THE ARCTIC IN THE CITY: REINVENTING POLAR SCIENCE IN THE PUBLIC SPACES OF VIENNA, BUDAPEST AND PRAGUE IN 1874

presented by the Cities and Science: Urban History and the History of Science in the Study of Early Modern and Modern Europe CEU Summer University course and Pasts, Inc. Center for Historical Studies 

Date: 4:00 pm, Thursday, July 2, 2015
Venue: #310/A1, CEU, Zrinyi u. 14

Lecturer: ULRIKE SPRING, Associate Professor of History, Sogn og Fjordane University College, Norway
 
Abstract:
 
In September 1874, the scientific Austro-Hungarian polar expedition came back from the Arctic and was welcomed enthusiastically across Europe. In the following weeks, newspapers printed long essays on the expedition, and Vienna and Budapest organised public celebrations. The lecture will discuss the role science had in these welcoming celebrations and will show how it was used to negotiate political and cultural tensions in the monarchy.