Search Results

2 July - 13 July, 2018
History has seen several waves of constitution-building in the 20th century with an unparalleled boom starting in the 1990s after the fall of the Berlin wall. And while experts recently announced the end of this boom in new constitutions after the Cold War, the world is witnessing another wave of constitution-building, this time predominately in Africa.
9 July - 14 July, 2018

The 2018 Training School on “Collaborative local government for an open society” is one of the long-lasting series of summer courses for Ph.D. students interested in local government issues. It is co-organized by the European Urban Research Association and Standing Group for Local Government and Politics of ECPR, and gives an opportunity to develop the understanding of comparative local government studies in Europe and to discuss Ph.D. dissertation with experienced professors of different disciplines and coming from different countries.

2 July - 6 July, 2018

The biggest challenge to media freedom and independent journalism today is the systemic political corruption in which private interests shape the decision-making process in state bodies and institutions. Increasingly, a model of captive, politically instrumentalized news media financed by owners, corporations, social and political groups, or governments, is becoming dominant in most parts of the world. This has significant consequences on independent media and journalism.

25 June - 29 June, 2018

The Innovations in Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) workshop will highlight recent advances in information and communication technologies (ICTs) and how they are empowering both decision-makers and citizens to play a proactive role in managing disaster risks and providing more effective disaster response. The workshop will build upon experience and expertise in ICTs and DRR by both UNDP and a diverse network of organizations, who have come together over the past several years to train environmental professionals in the field.

2 July - 6 July, 2018

This intensive one-week course facilitates the exchange of ideas and cooperative projects among mediation scholars, practitioners, trainers, and students in the East and West. In addition to offering an introduction to mediation, the program provides a teaching and training template for mediation training for scholars and practitioners from around the world to adapt for use in their home countries.
 

12 July - 19 July, 2018
The course will explore issues related to the nature and justification of intuitions, the concept of a reflective equilibrium, the ideas of moral testimony and moral expertise, how disagreement in moral matters affects our accounts of moral knowledge and evolutionary debunking arguments of morality.
 
Each thematic area will be examined separately. For each area, a lecture will address the most important themes, followed by discussions in seminar format. Students will be required to prepare the corresponding collection of principal texts found in their reader.
25 June - 29 June, 2018

The introduction of lifelong learning (LLL) in European universities has been discussed extensively at policy level since early 2000 in various contexts and with different arguments. Among others the arguments of the so-called knowledge society and its need for a qualified workforce, the European demographics and the extended university's mission have all been invoked to highlight the importance of lifelong learning and the role played by universities in helping communities and individuals to meet professional and societal challenges.

2 July - 13 July, 2018
The Summer School will focus on the nexus between Romani identities and antigypsyism. Antigypsyism is a core concept of critical Romani studies, and can be used methodologically, analytically and theoretically as a way of understanding the position of Roma in Europe historically and in the present moment. A growing body of scholarship grounds our understanding of antigypsyism in the Europeanization of the Roma issue and neoliberal regime expansion following the fall of communism.
9 July - 13 July, 2018

The importance of territory in the current world order is undeniable.  Recent years have seen an explosion of empirical and normative scholarly interest on the impact of migration, globalization and state succession on territorial sovereignty across many disciplines. In addition to the more “traditional” territorial disputes, mass migration has raised new dilemmas over territorial ownership, peoplehood and statehood. 

16 July - 21 July, 2018
This summer school will examine critically the ways in which the social sciences and biology have been historically bound up over the course of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. From the beginning of that period, social and political theories exerted their influence on the knowledge produced by biological disciplines, while the social sciences built their understanding of human societies by drawing on what biology could tell them about human nature.
24 June - 29 June, 2018
The ambition of humans to elevate themselves beyond their natural means and to acquire transcendental insight and power is as ancient as our cultural history. The goal of this course is to highlight some aspects of this ambition that are related to Western Esotericism, thus to provide a solid picture of some key phenomena of mysticism, magic, and occult trends in intellectual history. Special attention will be paid to the historical period of late Antiquity to the early modern, as well as the post-Romanticism era.
2 July - 10 July, 2018

The purpose of the course is to acquaint course participants with recent work on the history and metaphysics of the concept of scientific law and related concepts that are central to the development and understanding of science. These concepts are important to philosophical accounts of both science and to metaphysics. While there has been a great deal of active research on writing on the metaphysics of laws and also on the history of the concept of laws there has been little interaction between researchers involved in each project.

4 July - 11 July, 2018

Some see the current nationalist turn in politics worldwide, with its crackdowns on international migration, proposals to limit trade and slash budgets for humanitarian and development aid, as the beginning of the end of globalization.

28 June - 4 July, 2018

The precautionary principle is a key principle of environment governance. It poses challenges to both environmental science and environmental governance because it applies to 'situations of scientific complexity, uncertainty and ignorance, where there may be a need to act in order to avoid, or reduce, potentially serious or irreversible threats to health and/or the environment, using an appropriate strength of scientific evidence, and taking into account the pros and cons of action and inaction and their distribution' (EEA 2013, p. 681).

9 July - 14 July, 2018
Thinking about the possible and impossible and exploring counterfactual (“what if?”) scenarios are fundamental aspects of the human mind. The boundary conditions for counterfactual thinking, and the extent to which it shares the same underlying cognitive machinery with related abilities such as episodic future thinking and pretend play, are currently the subjects of substantial debate in philosophy and psychology. 
8 July - 17 July, 2019

The course is designed to familiarize participants with the increasingly influential, though still controversial thesis that thinking is a kind of experience, and that conceptual mental content is constituted by a proprietary, sui generis kind of non-sensory phenomenology. In addition to the familiar sensory kinds of experience – visual, auditory, olfactory, etc., there is, according to this view, a cognitive kind of phenomenology. Just as there is “something it’s like” to have visual, auditory, etc.

1 July - 5 July, 2019

The aim of this summer school is to examine the field of migration studies with a focus on three key aspects:

(1) reflecting on “migration studies” as a discipline and critically examining the assumptions that underlie the production of knowledge about migrants and migration;
(2) reflecting on the process of migration research fieldwork and of conducting work “in the field” with migrants and other related actors;

1 July - 12 July, 2019
History has seen several waves of constitution-building in the 20th century with an unparalleled boom starting in the 1990s after the fall of the Berlin wall. And while experts recently announced the end of this boom in new constitutions after the Cold War, the world is witnessing another wave of constitution-building, this time predominately in Africa.
15 July - 23 July, 2019
This 7-day seminar in digital humanities research methods is designed to expose a new generation of scholars in Cold War history and culture to methods of analysis and discovery involving computational techniques. Designed and run by NEP4DISSENT (New Exploratory Phase in Research on East European Cultures of Dissent, nep4dissent.eu), COST Action 16213, the inspiration for the course is built around the transfer of knowledge from technologists and data scientists to humanists.
27 June - 5 July, 2019
This course focuses on the construction of memory and identity narratives through images. Its seminars and workshops are designed to complement each other while developing participants’ abilities to analyze and communicate with and through images which is a required competency nowadays both inside and outside of the academia.
22 July - 26 July, 2019

With the recent adoption of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the call by UN Secretary General for a “revolution” in the use of data for sustainable development, geospatial technologies have tremendous potential to effectively and efficiently monitor SDG progress. In the fifteen years since the adoption of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), the amount of data available, as well as data collection and processing methods have changed substantially.

1 July - 12 July, 2019
The course is designed for participants who have a business idea, who think that during their career they might start their own business, or who want to develop their entrepreneurial mindset and skills. This course is highly interactive and helps the participants to develop entrepreneurial skills.
15 July - 19 July, 2019

According to the UNHCR, approximately 67 million people are currently displaced around the world as a result of the unprecedented levels of armed conflict. Similarly, millions of people are migrating in search of better economic opportunities with about 258 million people now living in a country which is not the country of their birth.  Refugee and migrant children are often excluded from early childhood settings and schools alongside others who are also excluded on the grounds of disability, race, language, religion, gender, and poverty.

1 July - 5 July, 2019

The Innovations in Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) workshop will highlight recent advances in information and communication technologies (ICTs) and how they are empowering both decision-makers and citizens to play a proactive role in managing disaster risks and providing more effective disaster response. The workshop will build upon experience and expertise in ICTs and DRR by both UNDP and a diverse network of organizations, who have come together over the past several years to train environmental professionals in the field.

25 June - 29 June, 2019

In recent decades Internationalization-at-Home (IaH) has been viewed by many European universities as a solution for providing students the global competencies required from professionals working in an international and interconnected society. The goal of IaH is to transform classrooms and campuses into spaces that intentionally promote intercultural, international, and global learning.

1 July - 5 July, 2019

Journalism is facing a deep crisis of public trust. Some say it is more serious than the financial crisis that has clobbered news media over the course of the past decade. But the two, in fact, are deeply connected: subscriptions or various forms of memberships seem to be the only business model that works in this new era of journalism, and there is a close link between people’s decision to pay for news and the level of trust they have in the news product they buy and the people who make it.

15 July - 19 July, 2019

This intensive one-week course facilitates the exchange of ideas and cooperative projects among mediation scholars, practitioners, trainers, and students in the East and West. In addition to offering an introduction to mediation, the program provides a teaching and training template for mediation training for scholars and practitioners from around the world to adapt for use in their home countries.
 

1 July - 10 July, 2019

There is a long tradition of cooperation between ethnography and musicology in Central and Eastern Europe, which has been challenged by modern trans-disciplinary approaches of ethnomusicology. Combined with the extensive experience of CEU’s Cultural Heritage Studies and CEU’s Arts and Culture Center, this course provides an insight into the intangible heritage scene and its most universally accessible fields: music.

16 July - 25 July, 2019

Political Psychology is a discipline that experienced significant growth in the Anglo-American academic world in recent years. However, it has only started to flourish in Central and Eastern Europe nowadays. Its research is dedicated to understanding how we, humans, perceive and react to the world around us, especially on our interactions with political systems.

1 July - 12 July, 2019
The Summer School will focus on the nexus between Romani identities and antigypsyism. Antigypsyism is a core concept of critical Romani studies, and can be used methodologically, analytically and theoretically as a way of understanding the position of Roma in Europe historically and in the present moment. A growing body of scholarship grounds our understanding of antigypsyism in the Europeanization of the Roma issue and neoliberal regime expansion following the fall of communism.
1 July - 5 July, 2019

Recent philosophical discussions about discrimination have focused on what makes discrimination wrongful in paradigmatic cases, such as in examples involving sexist hiring committees or racist university admissions procedures. The purpose of this course is to provide a forum within which to build upon these foundations by exploring the further complications that arise in more controversial cases of the kind that we encounter most commonly. Throughout the course, we will explore questions such as the following:

27 June - 3 July, 2019

The precautionary principle is a key principle of environment governance. It poses challenges to both environmental science and environmental governance because it applies to 'situations of scientific complexity, uncertainty and ignorance, where there may be a need to act in order to avoid, or reduce, potentially serious or irreversible threats to health and/or the environment, using an appropriate strength of scientific evidence, and taking into account the pros and cons of action and inaction and their distribution' (EEA 2013, p. 681).