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14 January - 8 February, 2021
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) became essential tools not only in academic research but also in our daily life. GIS includes (but not limited to) mechanisms of geographic data collection, storage, visualization and analysis. The range of available technologies and application areas is wide and the choice of solution depends on issues concerned and level of computer literacy.
 
The present course introduces geospatial data visualization (mapping) using qGIS, the most popular open-source free GIS package.
13 January - 8 February, 2021
Every hour numerous satellites generate hundreds of images of Earth surface, capturing multiple aspects of anthropogenic activities as well as environmental processes. For many years having access to, analyzing and interpreting these petabytes of information (very Big Data) was a privilege of a handful of experts.
28 June - 7 July, 2021

History has seen several waves of constitution-building in the 20th century with an unparalleled boom starting in the 1990s after the fall of the Berlin Wall. And while experts recently announced the end of this boom in new constitutions after the Cold War, the world is witnessing another wave of constitution-building, this time predominately in Africa.

18 January - 22 January, 2021
The course is co-hosted by the Blinken Open Society Archives, CEU’s progressive hub for digital Cold War history and a natural home for scholarship conducted in this area. Our first 2019 course already based its demo datasets on digitized content from the Blinken OSA collections: records of the Radio Free Europe research institute, and of RFE’s telex communication between New York and Munich in the 1960s.
19 June - 29 June, 2021
This course asks how and why art and open societies have sustained each other across history, and how they may continue to do so beyond the crisis they jointly undergo in the current context of rapid technological, economic and political transformation. While focusing more specifically on artistic production, on its present crisis, and its possible futures, this course puts art in the broader perspective of the history of cultural production, and of its social, political and economic conditions of possibility at the modern intersection of state and market.
26 July - 30 July, 2021
In the post-Covid-19 world, the problems already experienced by democracies with regards to social divisions and diminishing trust in public institutions are exacerbated by a growing epistemic crisis concerning the simultaneous need and contestation of expertise for public policy purposes.
4 May - 18 June, 2021
This course brings together people with their own local stories of the struggles and success of people and communities transitioning towards a sustainable energy system. Participants in this course will learn the skills to tell stories and multi-media narratives around energy transitions.
12 July - 16 July, 2021
This course offers participants the opportunity to learn about and experience an instructional design approach specific to the kinds of pedagogies that are a hallmark of Liberal Arts and Sciences education. Participants will engage in course and skills-building activities designed specifically with engaged and writing-rich pedagogies in mind.
21 June - 25 June, 2021
An international group of scholars, representing three continents, and including world-renowned author Ian Buruma, proposes a five-day summer university course for advanced B.A., M.A. and Ph.D. students in fact-based narratives, also known as literary journalism in English language scholarship, reportage in the former Soviet area, or crónica in Latin America.
5 July - 9 July, 2021
The past decade has seen the mainstreaming of concerns about inequalities, with the work of scholars and of social movements – from Occupy to the International Women’s Strike – centring the social and economic injustice created by persistent inequalities of income, gender, race and class.